Guns N Roses Biggest 80s Band according to YouTube

It’s official – November Rain is the 80s video with more views than the rest, and by quite some distance. In fact, it gets over 500k new views every DAY, not bad considering it was released 26 years ago. The idea of Guns N Roses has become as big, in some respects, as Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd. GNR had and have a mythology that is so massive it actually has grown in their public visibility. Instead of not being able to live up to the hype and expectations the idea of a GNR reunion has made fans more insatiable, hence the Appetite box set as fans either relive their past with the group or new fans discover the music and hype that made GnR iconic.

Remember when all those people complained about how long Chinese Democracy was taking or wondered what Axl was thinking? Yeah, neither do most other people. Turns out he knew what he was doing all along.

Guns ‘N’ Roses may or may not be the biggest rock band in the world today. But no one can argue their place in history has only grown. The biggest video of the ‘80s on YouTube? It’s not, as you would expect Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” or anything from Prince’s Purple Rain or a Madonna clip. It is Guns ‘N’ Roses’ “Sweet Child O’ Mine” at 692 million views. SO GNR have the biggest videos of the ’80s and ’90s. Damn.

Singles chart to include YouTube views

The UK singles graph is getting another update to incorporate music video streams and downloads out of the blue.

While informal recordings or other client produced substance won’t tally towards craftsman streams – official recordings played on YouTube, Apple, Tidal and Spotify will.

The new principles will kick in on Friday 29 June and have been affirmed by record marks and BBC Radio 1, which communicates the graph every Friday.

In 2017 the music business saw a few records in spilling and YouTube sees crushed: “Despacito” by Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee turned into the most-viewed YouTube video ever, while Dua Lipa had the most=watched video by a British lady that year.

Charts’ chief executive Martin Talbot told the BBC: “The way that music fans are consuming music is changing by the month. “It seems anachronistic to be saying ‘we’re only going to count the song’ when it also has a video attached to it.”

He also pointed out that big-budget videos won’t necessarily reap the benefits of the new chart rules, commenting: “This isn’t going to be a handbrake turn… we’re not going to suddenly see dozens of songs in the Top 20 that weren’t there before.” The move, which comes exactly four years after audio streams were incorporated into the chart, has been approved by record labels and BBC Radio 1, which broadcasts the chart every Friday.

ArtistSong
1Ed SheeranShape Of You
2Luis Fonsi ft Daddy YankeeDespacito
3Clean BanditRockabye
4Ed SheeranCastle On The Hill
5French Montana ft. Sway LeeUnforgettable
6DJ Khaled ft Justin Bieber, Quavo & Chance The RapperI’m The One
7Dua LipaNew Rules
8Jason Derulo ft Nicki Minaj & TYSwalla
9Little MixTouch
10Camila Cabello ft Young ThugHavana

In a test, melodies with viral recordings just delighted in a little lift to their outline position.

A few craftsmen and video makers have just respected the move, with pop vocalist Dua Lipa taking note of how her breakout video for “New Rules” was “extremely essential to me in my profession” while Years and Years frontman Olly Alexander – who is discharging a video for each tune on the band’s forthcoming collection Palo Santo – said numerous fans think about a video as an inherent piece of a melody: “The reality they’ll be considered now for the outlines is something worth being thankful for,” he said.

 

How to Embed YouTube Videos into Ghost CMS

Ghost CMS is built for simplicity, thus Embedding a YouTube video is also very simple.

But

You would get lost in your simple theme if you messed with your HTML code.

Here is what will your visitors see in case you made mistake a mistake while embedding your YouTube video.

You also need to setup your height, width, frame, and many other aspects of your video.

We are going to discuss this step by step, so you keep focusing on your writing instead running into Coding Math.

Here we go!

Embedding the Video

  1. Log into your account either it is self-hosted version or Ghost Pro.
  2. Navigate to your editor as usual.
  3. Grab your YouTube video embed code as following:

 

Will Vimeo ever be Bigger than YouTube?

If you’ve ever watched a video online then the chances are you have visited the YouTube website to do it. But did you know that there are other websites out there that will allow you to watch, upload and share videos just like YouTube? In fact, there are many websites out there that offer the similar or even better functionality than YouTube. One of the largest of such websites is called Vimeo.

Vimeo was founded in November 2004 approximately a year earlier than YouTube, yet it only receives around 0.98% of the voice compared to YouTube’s 97.2%, and has only 100 million registered users compared to YouTube’s 1 billion. The main reason for this is thought to be that while the creators of Vimeo were developing it in their spare time alongside their college work, YouTube was heavily invested in by huge technology companies more or less from the outset, and then was sold to Google in 2006.

Despite the fact that YouTube is so much bigger, Vimeo is still pretty big. It still receives over 100 million visits every month, and makes around $40 million each year. So it’s no small fish, and it is probably YouTube’s biggest competitor, so is there any chance of Vimeo becoming bigger than YouTube in the future?

Probably not. For starters, the fact that YouTube already has over a billion registered users will mean that it will be pretty difficult to overtake. Although there are 7 billion people on the planet, there is still a massive potential audience for Vimeo, but the snowball effect will mean that as Vimeo continues to grow, so will YouTube. The difference is that YouTube will grow at a much larger rate as it has the financial capital and share in the video upload market to just keep growing.

It also helps that YouTube is owned by the largest search engine in the world, Google. When people search on Google and videos appear in the search result, statistically there will be more YouTube videos than any other website because of the fact that YouTube has so many more videos than the other video sharing websites.

There is also the fact that Google could show bias to its own products and therefore only return YouTube videos in search results. Google denies doing this, but there have been examples when this has in fact been the case. If Google is the largest search engine in the world and is not showing Vimeo videos in search results then it will be very difficult for Vimeo to become more popular.

One thing that may work in Vimeo’s favour is the fact that YouTube has so many ads these days. Ads appear before, after and now in the middle of some YouTube videos, which many people find extremely irritating. Vimeo offer a ‘Plus’ membership where advertisements will not be shown when members are logged in. Providing that this stays at good value for money, it could be a major reason for people to begin switched to Vimeo from YouTube.

There are also several other annoyances for YouTube users such as the fact that YouTube keep closing accounts, and the YouTube autoplay feature doesn’t work for a lot of people. These may be too much for some people to put up with and if they begin to search online for a YouTube alternative, Vimeo will be the most popular result.

Why did YouTube close my account?

If you have a website and you have been using YouTube as a method of driving traffic to your website, then you may want to take note. It would appear that Google – who have owned YouTube since late 2006 – are on a mission to clean up the internet by ridding it of spam and ensuring that all content created and published by webmasters is ‘useful’ to those who are reading it.

For many years, thousands upon thousands of people have been complaining that their YouTube accounts have been terminated with not so much as a warning, an explanation or any hope of getting them back. Today there seem to be no signs of things changing, as it is estimated that Google permanently deletes over 10,000 YouTube accounts every single day.

 

Why is this Happening?

Google’s official explanation for the sudden removal of accounts and uploaded videos is that such content is in violation of one or more of over a dozen different policies that they have created and enforced over the years. These policies have been designed and created in order to ensure that all videos uploaded are suitable for the YouTube audience.

As a result, all videos that are uploaded to the website are monitored in order to ensure that they do not violate any of these policies. Depending on the nature of the content of the video, it may be subject to further moderation and in many cases even manual review. YouTube account holders who upload too many videos that violate the strict policies will find that they are promptly banished from the website, and any subsequent accounts created afterwards – regardless of the actual content of the videos uploaded – will suffer from the same fate.

YouTube Web Video Stars

Can it really be only five years ago? YouTube is so culturally ingrained that thinking of a time before it existed is almost as mind-boggling as thinking of the pre-internet era itself. None the less, the site’s first video looks very much like the historical artefact it is. Uploaded on 23 April 2005 “Me at the zoo” is a poor-quality, 19-second clip featuring co-founder Jawed Karim standing in front of San Diego Zoo’s elephant enclosure. He says: “The cool thing about these guys is that they have really, really long, um… trunks.” He pauses. “And that’s pretty much all there is to say.”

Except of course, there was a lot more to say. Five years after Karim and two fellow PayPal employees Chad Hurley (now YouTube’s CEO) and Steve Chen (now chief technology officer) founded their video-sharing website, it hosts more than 120 million videos and 300 million accounts. Thanks to its founders, who sold it to Google a year after its inception for $1.65bn, the word “viral” now suggests a popular video before it does a nasty infection.

The site is a phenomenon that’s generated a whole culture of sub-phenomena with its canon of YouTube celebrities. Never before had anyone with a video camera been able to reach a potential audience of millions and for many – including pensioner Peter Oakley and BMX rider Danny MacAskill (both featured here) – they did so by accident. But when Hurley announced in 2007 that the site would start sharing advertising revenue with key “content providers” it meant that stars like Tay Zonday (also featured) were able to turn their hobby into financially viable, even lucrative, careers.

Tthe science behind what makes a video a hit and a vlogger a star remains vague. As Zonday says: “You could sooner herd cats than plan for the public to like or dislike something.” It’s an illuminating choice of phrase: cats are, of course, a pretty good bet. Likewise babies, though it’s still perplexing that a merely moderately amusing family moment is the most watched YouTube video of all time. “Charlie bit my finger” is a 56-second clip in which Charlie, aged one, bites the finger of his big brother Harry, aged three. It’s been viewed almost 177 million times.